Alaska Software Inc. - Anyone using Postgre with quasi ISAM interface with complete success?
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AuthorTopic: Anyone using Postgre with quasi ISAM interface with complete success?
Chris ChambersAnyone using Postgre with quasi ISAM interface with complete success?
on Fri, 17 Jun 2022 15:02:28 -0700
Hi Folks,

I am still sitting on the fence, waiting for some encouragement to move 
from Version 1.9 to Version 2.0. I have tried the evaluation and I 
cannot see any benefit yet to switch. I am a heavy user of ADS and I am 
still using  the DBF table format without any problems. The quasi SQL 
works extremely well and provides all the requirements that we have. I 
can not even get the quasi ISAM in Postgresql to come even close in 
performance in Version 2.0.

We tried all the dbfupsizing and  found the overall performance to be 
horrendously slow, no matter what, or how the indexes were created.

Frank at Alaska could not tell me why I should switch, maybe someone out 
there
can convince me it would be a good idea to  do so.

I am open to ideas, Postgresql is a fine database system, I think it 
gets a bad rap with xbase++ 2.0.

Love to hear from you.

Regards to all

Chris C.
Chris Carmac Re: Anyone using Postgre with quasi ISAM interface with complete success?
on Wed, 22 Jun 2022 09:31:30 -0400
On 6/17/2022 6:02 PM, Chris Chambers wrote:
> Hi Folks,
> 
> I am still sitting on the fence, waiting for some encouragement to move 
> from Version 1.9 to Version 2.0. I have tried the evaluation and I 
> cannot see any benefit yet to switch. I am a heavy user of ADS and I am 
> still using  the DBF table format without any problems. The quasi SQL 
> works extremely well and provides all the requirements that we have. I 
> can not even get the quasi ISAM in Postgresql to come even close in 
> performance in Version 2.0.
> 
> We tried all the dbfupsizing and  found the overall performance to be 
> horrendously slow, no matter what, or how the indexes were created.
> 
> Frank at Alaska could not tell me why I should switch, maybe someone out 
> there
> can convince me it would be a good idea to  do so.
> 
> I am open to ideas, Postgresql is a fine database system, I think it 
> gets a bad rap with xbase++ 2.0.
> 
> Love to hear from you.
> 
> Regards to all
> 
> Chris C.

Chris,

I think there are two main reasons to look into using Postgresql...

1. The future of ADS is uncertain.  SAP is still committed to supporting 
it, for the time being, but they do not seem to be interested in adding 
new features or benefits to it.  Development has pretty much stalled.

2. You have to purchase ADS licenses, and pass that expense along to 
your customers.  Postgresql is open source, and free, so switching to 
Postgresql could potentially generate more profits, or enable lower/more 
competitive pricing, if you pass the savings along.

That being said, I don't have a lot of hope for the PGDBE.  I've been 
experimenting with it since 2017.  At one point, Alaska Software had my 
application installed on one of their test servers, so they could 
experiment directly with it. They were never able to get it to work at a 
production level. It was too slow, and some screens just didn't work at 
all.

If a developer were building a new Xbase++ application from scratch, I 
think they could use the PGDBE to create an application that would 
perform at a production level.  You would have to abandon ISAM type code 
altogether, and use SQL queries throughout.  However, if you have an 
application like mine, built over 20+ years with hundreds of thousands 
of lines of code using ISAM navigation, I don't think it will ever work 
as intended. That's not entirely surprising, given the tremendous 
differences between ISAM and SQL database architectures.

The only way I can envision effectively migrating from ADS to Postgresql 
is to convert all ISAM code to SQL queries with ADS and the switch over 
to Postgresql. For me, that would basically entail rewriting my entire 
application, which took me over 20 years to build, and is being added to 
every day.  I'm not sure that is realistically possible.  I would love 
to wrong about that.

Chris Carmac